Grass-fed Veal Sale through August

Sharing a recipe for a grilled rack of veal in honor of our August sale (20% off our Grass-fed Rose Veal). Get it while it lasts.

 

Grilled Porcini-Rubbed Rack of Veal

Serves 8

Ingredients

    • 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
    • 1/4 cup porcini mushroom powder (from about 3/4 ounce dried mushrooms)
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
    • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
    • 1 (5–6-pounds) six-bone rack of veal, chine bone removed (not frenched)
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • Flaky sea salt

Special equipment:

    • A spice mill or a mortar and pestle

Preparation

  • Prepare grill for medium–high, indirect heat (for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one side of grill; for a gas grill, leave one or two burners off). Coarsely grind red pepper flakes in spice mill or with mortar and pestle. Combine ground red pepper flakes, porcini powder, sugar, kosher salt, and black pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub veal all over with oil, followed by enough spice mixture to coat nicely (about 1/2 cup), patting to adhere.
  • Grill veal over direct heat, turning occasionally, until deeply browned all over, 15–20 minutes total. Move veal to indirect heat, placing bone side down, and grill, turning every 20 minutes or so, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of loin registers 115°, 1 1/2–2 hours. (Check after 30 minutes—once thermometer registers 100°, the temperature will climb much faster.) Meat will continue to cook when taken off the grill, so pull 10° before finishing temp.
  • Transfer veal to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut loin from the bones in one piece. Slice between bones to separate and grill over direct heat, turning often, until crisped and well charred, about 5 minutes.
  • Grill loin over direct heat, cut side up, just to reheat slightly (do not grill the cut side), about 4 minutes. Slice loin 1/2″ thick and transfer to a platter. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve with bones alongside.

Finishing Temps

  • Rare — 120F
  • Medium Rare — 125F
  • Medium — 130F
  • Medium Well — 135F
  • Well — 140F

Just remember, if you like your meat more on the medium to well done side, make sure you turn the heat way down to allow the meat to cook slowly. Your patience will be rewarded.

Do Ahead

  1. Veal can be grilled 2 hours ahead. Do not cut meat from bones; hold at room temperature. Grill over high to reheat, about 4 minutes, before finishing as directed above.

 

Bon Appetite June 2015, Chad Colby

Take A Walk On The Wild(er) Side.

Take a walk into the pastures with one of our farmers and learn about grass-based sustainable farming and the making of delicious farmstead cheeses. Hint: it all starts with the pastures! We’ll cover the history of the farm, and why we started farming the way we do now.


Public Pasture walks are one hour long and cover all sorts of uneven ground. Wear appropriate footware and long pants, as we could be in long grass, wet ground, and all kinds of hillocks and tussocks. You may meet animals up close and personal.

$10 per person. Children 5 and under are free. No need for a reservation, but feel free to call ahead for a mud report!

The Molt Has Begun

If you have noticed a dip in our egg availability it is due to the seasonal molting of the flock. Once a year chickens lose and regrow their feathers, a process that is takes a lot of energy and causes stress. Most chicken quit laying or lay next to no eggs for the entire 5-7 week process. But when the hens are done, they have a fresh crop of strong, new feathers to keep them warm through the winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the molt is finished, egg production will go up until the days are short and light is scarce. Then the chickens lay off again (no pun intended) until the days lengthen in March.

This is a normal chicken behavior, and one we roll with every late summer. We hope you can stand in solidarity with our hens in their molting time.

 

 

Make Your Cheese Dreams a Reality!

Our cheesemakers are on the hunt for two good people who want to learn how to make a quality farmstead cheese.

The Cheese Room Assistant assists the cheesemakers in the make room, helps care for cheese in the aging rooms (affinage), and helps pack and deliver cheeses to our wholesale customers. 

Our Cheesemaking Internship/Apprenticeship offers an overview of the wonderful and delicious world of cheesemaking. This spot is full time with a stipend, and housing is available.

Culinary or cheese experience is nice but not absolutely necessary. What is needed is someone energetic, diligent and attentive to details. (Click the above links for details and contact info.)

Don’t miss the opportunity to work with our award-winning cheesmakers to further your cheesmaking dreams!

#goodfoodjob #cherrygrovefarmteam

Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork On Sale Through July

Summer means barbecues, in the backyard, on the boat, at the beach, on the deck. Hanging with friends and family… fresh tomatoes, corn, watermelon, peaches… and sweet savory barbecue sauce.

slow cooker pulled pork

Sublime Pulled Pork

A slow cooker pulled pork is a great way to feed a crowd, and since you can make it in advance, you get to take off the apron and spend time with your guests.

Our whey-fed pork butt and shoulder roasts are on sale through July at 15% off the regular per pound price. Come into the farm store or ask our market staffer at your local farm market to bring one for you!

We’ve included a recipe here to give you a good start. There are interesting variations for the cooking liquid including root beer, pernilla, and sweet spicy vinegars. Try something new!

Tag us @cherrygrovefarm with pics of your summer fun.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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