Events

The Cow Parade Is Back!

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Are you ready for the fun?

Local Music, Local Food, Educational Presentations and Vendors, Face Painting, Story Time, Hayrides, Farm Tours, The Annual Parade of Cows, and the Evening Bonfire.

Saturday, Nov 5th from 1pm to 8pm.

Who is going to be here?

Stonybrook Millstone Watershed Flying Fish Beer
Jammin’ Crepes Birds and Bees Farm
Mecha Artisan Chocolates Madame Fromage & Marisa McClellan
Artist and Chemist Soapmakers Mercer Master Gardeners
Pinelands Folk Music and Basketry Emma Morrow’s Handspun Wool
Jake’s Oxen and Drayage Demo Sunnycrow Photography
Four Pups Organic Dog Treats Face Painting by Lawren
Mercer County 4-H Lori Lee, Children’s Author

Featuring music by Sparkle Pony.

sparkle-pony

What a great way to say thank you for a good harvest and a great year! We hope you will come and join us!

 

 

Everything is Made Magic in Moonlight

From April to October, the farm runs a public farm tour each month. On September 16th, we’ll offer a moonlight stroll of our meadows and cow paths.

Each tour is a chance for us to stroll the farm and really talk with people interested in what we do: cheesemaking, sustainable farm life, homestead animal husbandry, and the benefits of unplugging from the world for a time.

Moonlight Field by Jody9 on Flickr

Moonlight Field by Jody9 on Flickr

We always talk about the farm (and answer questions) but our themes change… in April, for  Raw Milk Cheese Appreciation Day, folks toured with the cheesemaker and learned about farmstead cheesemaking. In June, when calving started, we chose a walk with our dairy farmer to “Meet the Milkers”. Over the summer we touched on native plants and pollinators, local lore and history, and how European-style agriculture impacted the native woods and fields. It is all a riff on the same idea, how farming sustainably is a long-term kindness to our lands.

This month we will do a little star-gazing, watch for bats, and listen for owls and other night creatures. Enjoy the farm as few ever see it, on a moonlit Indian summer evening.

We are encouraging folks to bring a blanket or mat, wear clothes for walk in in tall grass and good walking shoes. Join us at 9pm, Friday, Sept 16th.

See details and reserve your space here

 

Ten Years of Cheesemaking!

“Dishing Up New Jersey” Locavore Farm Dinner

Friday, July 8th
This summer we mark ten years making aged farmstead cheeses. In that time, we have benefited from the expertise of dedicated farmers moving us to a grass-based model, and fine cheesemakers refining recipes and improving our facilities.

We could think of no better way to celebrate our milestone anniversary than by collaborating with some of our favorite local foodsmiths on a farm dinner, designed by local food artisans for local food enthusiasts.

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John Holl, NJ food journalist and beer enthusiast is a partner in this event, and will be on hand signing his newest cookbook, “Dishing Up New Jersey”, which features many of our favorite local chef’s and food producers (and our dinner collaborators).

Dine garden-side at the farm with:
Chef Renato of 12 Farms Restaurant in Hightstown,
Barbara Simpson of Muirhead Foods,
Marilyn Besner of Wildflour Bakery and Cafe,
Gabriel and Matt Carbone of The Bent Spoon,
David Zaback at Z Food Farm, and
Mikey Azzarra of Zone 7.

The evening will include a four-course chef’s menu, farm tour, book signing, cheese and beer tasting, and time to enjoy warm summer breezes and the nightly sunset. Cherry Grove Farm cheeses and whey-fed pork will be featured. (There will be a prize for most creative place setting!)

Dinner details can be found here.

Foraging the Farm

Last September we collaborated on a Foraging Class that included a four course wild food tasting menu with local chef Ben Walmer. It was so well received that we promised to forage again in spring!

foraging

Learning about wild edibles, and the sustainable way to harvest them, gets you out into the woods and fields, focusing on the myriad types of green and woody things around us. Perhaps foraging won’t make a dent in urban food desserts anytime soon. However, the change in mentality, the idea that healthy food doesn’t have to be expensive or come from a fancy store, is a big leap in the right direction.

Someone pointed out to us that our foraging class was scheduled for Memorial Day weekend, so by popular demand we have moved it to the following Sunday, June 5. We’ll take you on a walk out onto the farm, talk about wild edibles, and show you what’s popping up right outside our own backdoor.

Be prepared to eat tasty bites! BYO…http://www.shopcherrygrovefarm.com/product-p/cl-hs16.htm)

!Ven, Fiesta!

A few years ago “farm to table” was a new concept. It fell under the same category as whiskey bars and latte foam art. And as much as we love a well-curated whiskey haunt, so too have we come to love “farm to table”. The latter has become a way of life, drawing attention to the importance of organic growing, the ecological havoc wreaked by not eating local, and the true treasures in our own backyards. As a farm, we want “farm to table” to keep its momentum. So the question becomes, how? And with so many small farms popping up, how is our approach unique.

For us the answer lies in Farm Dinners. (Though the concept is the same, we’ve dropped “to table” – the term has lost the shiny new appeal it had in its rollout.) Every farm has its own version, but no two farms are exactly alike. At Cherry Grove Farm, we have a beautiful, peaceful property, just far enough off the beaten path to be “out-of-the-way”, but so close to everything that we could throw a stone to hit it. These dinners provide new eyes through which to see not just our farm, but small farming in general. And since everyone who works here is passionate about what we do (and does cool, related stuff on the side), there’s always a conversation.

Now everyone has an opinion about the type of cuisine for these things, and suggestions run from straight-up local to the Middle East, and with so many talented culinarians 12963407_1140513845989600_2944712135190115925_nin the area, the challenge becomes, not choosing the food, but finding someone who can bring local “farm to table” to exotic cuisine, and transport us, if only for an evening, to another place. Shelley Wiseman is that someone: her locality at Tullamore Farms puts her right in our circle, and she doesn’t just dabble in exotics: she was immersed in Mexican culture, living in Mexico for five years running her own French cooking school. It makes perfect sense for her to kick off our Farm Dinner season with “Fiesta Cinco de Mayo”.

Dinner is on Friday May 6, a day late for the holiday, but never mind. And this early in the season it might still be a bit nippy; we’re not worried ‘bout that, either. I am just so looking forward to her pork pozole, a warm stew for a spring night – and to kicking back in front of a roaring fire after dinner. Can you think of a better way to spend an evening with friends? Neither can I.

Join us here.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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