Farm Store

Grass-fed Veal Sale through August

Sharing a recipe for a grilled rack of veal in honor of our August sale (20% off our Grass-fed Rose Veal). Get it while it lasts.

 

Grilled Porcini-Rubbed Rack of Veal

Serves 8

Ingredients

    • 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
    • 1/4 cup porcini mushroom powder (from about 3/4 ounce dried mushrooms)
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
    • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
    • 1 (5–6-pounds) six-bone rack of veal, chine bone removed (not frenched)
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • Flaky sea salt

Special equipment:

    • A spice mill or a mortar and pestle

Preparation

  • Prepare grill for medium–high, indirect heat (for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one side of grill; for a gas grill, leave one or two burners off). Coarsely grind red pepper flakes in spice mill or with mortar and pestle. Combine ground red pepper flakes, porcini powder, sugar, kosher salt, and black pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub veal all over with oil, followed by enough spice mixture to coat nicely (about 1/2 cup), patting to adhere.
  • Grill veal over direct heat, turning occasionally, until deeply browned all over, 15–20 minutes total. Move veal to indirect heat, placing bone side down, and grill, turning every 20 minutes or so, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of loin registers 115°, 1 1/2–2 hours. (Check after 30 minutes—once thermometer registers 100°, the temperature will climb much faster.) Meat will continue to cook when taken off the grill, so pull 10° before finishing temp.
  • Transfer veal to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut loin from the bones in one piece. Slice between bones to separate and grill over direct heat, turning often, until crisped and well charred, about 5 minutes.
  • Grill loin over direct heat, cut side up, just to reheat slightly (do not grill the cut side), about 4 minutes. Slice loin 1/2″ thick and transfer to a platter. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve with bones alongside.

Finishing Temps

  • Rare — 120F
  • Medium Rare — 125F
  • Medium — 130F
  • Medium Well — 135F
  • Well — 140F

Just remember, if you like your meat more on the medium to well done side, make sure you turn the heat way down to allow the meat to cook slowly. Your patience will be rewarded.

Do Ahead

  1. Veal can be grilled 2 hours ahead. Do not cut meat from bones; hold at room temperature. Grill over high to reheat, about 4 minutes, before finishing as directed above.

 

Bon Appetite June 2015, Chad Colby

Notes From the Vat

 

The ladies headed in for milking.

The ladies headed in for milking.

Those ladies pictured above are starting to produce more milk. That increased milk production means more cheese! We made a big ol’ batch of Buttercup Brie Friday and we’ve made a few larger batches of flavored Jack to put away for the holiday season. We also used some of that grass-fed goodness to make a batch of Herdsman baskets which we just caved today. These guys should be ready in the fall.

basketwheels

Hope everyone had a chance this holiday weekend to eat something delicious and local! Some splendid summer ideas: Toma-stuffed squash blossoms! Herdsman melted over a burger! Havilah grated over corn and garlic scape pasta! All of the above!

CHEESE! CHEESE! CHEESE! 

Buttercup Brie
Tastes how it sounds. Like pure cultured butter. With a slight hint of mushroom under the rind. Pasteurized.

Rarebird
The thrush alone declares the immortal wealth and vigor that is in the forest… Whenever a man hears it he is young, and Nature is in her spring; whenever he hears it, it is a new world and a free country, and the gates of heaven are not shut against him.” – Henry David Thoreau 

Washed in Berliner Messe from Referend Bier Blendery. Squidgy texture with a porky, savory flavor. Yeasty, fruity notes towards the rind. Raw.

Wild Bird
Rarebird with a wild natural rind. Custard-y, reminiscent of torta-style cheeses. Citrus-y in the paste with savory notes under the rind. Raw.

Havilah
Reserve batches from Summer/Fall 2015 showing flavors ranging from caramelized onions and broth to brown sugar and candied orange peel. Batches from early Spring/Summer 2016 with notes of malt, beef stew, mushroom and toasted brioche. Nice balance of sweet and savory. Raw.

The Ploughman
Crumbly and yoghurt-y with hints of lemon. Think Lancashire or Wensleydale. Raw.

Herdsman
Full wheels from the winter with notes of walnut and herbs. Wonderfully dense and creamy. Raw.

Harvest Tomme
Winter batch of our ashed tomme. Pretty white interior with a line of ash running through the middle. Savory with flavors of roast meat and cracked pepper with a buttery crumble. Raw.

Toma
February and early March batches with notes of cured meat, orange blossom and lemon zest. Raw. 

Notes From The Vat

Greetings one and all!
 
Hope everyone weathered our sole winter storm well. I am certainly ready for real spring and looking forward to changes, like that really big, key change, cows on grass again.
 
Speaking of, next week two momentous things are happening; A) we are going out of production for about a week while we redo our flooring to improve food safety and reduce water use, and B) you’ll start hearing a new voice in cheese, as we’ve hired an awesome Affinage and Wholesale Sales sensation… Di Bruno Bros alumni… drumroll… Malachy Egan!
 
This will allow me more time with the cheese (whoopee!), which will be critical as we grow, and more engagement with you, our amazing patrons, from Malachy. But more on that next week. 
 
Here’s our lineup for this week:
 
I know a lot of you are wondering when standard Buttercup Brie will be back in action. I was looking for this week but I’m afraid we will have to wait one more week as the wrapped batch matures. 
 
Mooncakes Buttercup: As some of you know (and hence the reason Buttercup Brie has been unavailable) we had some errant blue mold in our white mold brie aging room two weeks ago. What we lost in our Buttercup Brie pipeline we gained in this one-off variation! As pictured below, these wheels are speckled or coated on one side with a wild blue that, mixed with the white mold, may also appear green/gray. Under this mixed mold rind you have the classic Buttercup texture, flakey touch at the center with a gooey outer buttery layer.  The flavor is a bright spotlight unto spring, a compound butter of orange essence with a hint of rhubarb. Pasteurized.
 
mooncakes brie
Raw Rodeo Brie: Some of these ripened with a pretty layer cake effect with a more acidic, bright lemony, flakey core surrounded by ripening exterior. Because this is a raw milk, bloomy rind, aged over 70 days, you are going to see a variety of yeasts and mold on the rind, not just the pure white of our standard Buttercup Brie.We have one more small batch of these for you all.

Trilby: A delicious beef n’ buttermilk washed rind profile, pretty sunset rinds. Denser texture than the prior batch, a stick to your ribs lingering creaminess (think Crottin or Sulles Sur Cher, curd nerds). Pasteurized.

 
Herdsman: Surprisingly high moisture, barnyardy baskets from last September. 
Firmer, sharper full wheels from October.
 
Toma: Pretty sunset orange hued colors, this is an ideal batch! Grab it while you can.
 
Havilah: Ole faithful, and for good reason! A spectrum that ranges from beef stew with caramelized onions, to roasted squash to caramel and toffee. Batches from Summer 2015. Perfect for this colder weather.
 
Abruzze Jawn: Back in action for a limited time! Get your fill of our cheese as cured meat curiosity while it lasts. 6 months old.
 
We still have some of our experimental blue cheese, the precocious Bette Davis Eyes in the farm store!
 
That’s all folks. Looking forward to your business as always. 
 
Paul

Expanding Our Local Commitment!

Have you seen our new “wing?” It’s small, but every square foot we can devote to our local food community counts.

In January, a survey went out through our newsletter and FB page asking for feedback from customers about our farm store and what other foods we might offer. We’ve had our own ideas brewing, but customer feedback cemented a plan to knock down a wall and create a little more space.

Blink, And It’s Done.

But construction is disruptive, right? And we have a business to run. How do you knock down and rebuild walls, and open up an old barn ceiling without disrupting customers? With a lot of planning, and a good construction partner.

So, the first Monday in February, we started preparing for change.

Graeme prepping the store.

Graeme prepping the store.

Tuesday, while the store was closed, we started demolition, knocking an interior wall down, ripping down the drop ceiling, disconnecting old plumbing, salvaging wood panels for reuse, and putting up a plastic sheet wall so the store could reopen on Wednesday.  

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Looking into the store through the old framing, soon to go.

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Beams match the store! No sanding required.

Wednesday, the new space was framed out (with a small private office for Paul), beams were scraped and cleaned, wood paneling was re-cut and re-used, and electric was re-mapped. Now, we had more light from the 3 windows added to our floor plan. Now, we could see the newly exposed old beams…

Thursday was to be the big finish and clean up, but we had a snow day. To stay on plan, Oliver Hamill, our fearless leader, came in and painted the new space inside the store so we’d be ready to show off the new wing as planned.

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Fresh paint and a recycled wooden panel wall.

Friday our regular customers found us placing shelving, re-organizing, re-merchandising, and spreading out into our new wing. It will take us some time to fully “move in” and use the space to its full potential, but for now, we are enjoying the light and the elbow room.

In time, we plan to add two additional freezer cases to better display our whey-fed pork, grass-fed lamb, beef, and seasonal rose veal. The extra space will also allow us to bring in pasture-raised roasting chickens and more prepared foods, like locally-raised heritage duck, locally-made pastas, pasta sauces, soups, and …. (you tell us!).

We hope you’ve enjoyed the pictures of the expansion. Come on into the store to see the finished space!


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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