Pastured Meats

Rich, Smoky Ham Hocks and Collard Greens

Braised collards in rich pot likker (pot liquor), simmered with smoked pork and onions until everything is meltingly tender, is a classic Southern dish. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.

 

Why It Works

  • Simmering the ham hocks until the meat falls off the bones creates a deeply flavorful broth.
  • Chicken stock adds even more flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds (680g) meaty smoked ham hocks (see note)
  • 2 medium yellow onions (about 1 pound; 450g), sliced into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 quarts (1.9L) homemade chicken stock, low-sodium store-bought chicken broth, or water
  • 3 pounds (1.3kg) collard greens, woody stems trimmed and leaves cut into thick ribbons
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Apple cider vinegar, to taste (optional)

Directions

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, combine ham hocks, onions, garlic, and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until hocks are very tender, 2 to 3 hours.
  • Remove ham hocks from liquid, transfer to a cutting board, and pull bones from meaty and fatty parts. Discard bones. Chop up meat into chunks and return it to pot.
  • Add collard greens, pressing down to submerge in liquid. Return to a simmer and cook, uncovered, until collards are very tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar to taste, if desired, then serve. (You can add vinegar to the pot, or let individual diners season their greens with it at the table.)

 

Notes

You can swap out the ham hocks for other smoked or cured pork products, like slab bacon or salt pork, as long as they aren’t lean meats, like smoked pork loin. Lean meat will dry up and toughen with extended cooking.

Taken from Daniel Gritzer and Serious Eats

Grass-fed Veal Sale through August

Sharing a recipe for a grilled rack of veal in honor of our August sale (20% off our Grass-fed Rose Veal). Get it while it lasts.

 

Grilled Porcini-Rubbed Rack of Veal

Serves 8

Ingredients

    • 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
    • 1/4 cup porcini mushroom powder (from about 3/4 ounce dried mushrooms)
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
    • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
    • 1 (5–6-pounds) six-bone rack of veal, chine bone removed (not frenched)
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • Flaky sea salt

Special equipment:

    • A spice mill or a mortar and pestle

Preparation

  • Prepare grill for medium–high, indirect heat (for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one side of grill; for a gas grill, leave one or two burners off). Coarsely grind red pepper flakes in spice mill or with mortar and pestle. Combine ground red pepper flakes, porcini powder, sugar, kosher salt, and black pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub veal all over with oil, followed by enough spice mixture to coat nicely (about 1/2 cup), patting to adhere.
  • Grill veal over direct heat, turning occasionally, until deeply browned all over, 15–20 minutes total. Move veal to indirect heat, placing bone side down, and grill, turning every 20 minutes or so, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of loin registers 115°, 1 1/2–2 hours. (Check after 30 minutes—once thermometer registers 100°, the temperature will climb much faster.) Meat will continue to cook when taken off the grill, so pull 10° before finishing temp.
  • Transfer veal to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut loin from the bones in one piece. Slice between bones to separate and grill over direct heat, turning often, until crisped and well charred, about 5 minutes.
  • Grill loin over direct heat, cut side up, just to reheat slightly (do not grill the cut side), about 4 minutes. Slice loin 1/2″ thick and transfer to a platter. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve with bones alongside.

Finishing Temps

  • Rare — 120F
  • Medium Rare — 125F
  • Medium — 130F
  • Medium Well — 135F
  • Well — 140F

Just remember, if you like your meat more on the medium to well done side, make sure you turn the heat way down to allow the meat to cook slowly. Your patience will be rewarded.

Do Ahead

  1. Veal can be grilled 2 hours ahead. Do not cut meat from bones; hold at room temperature. Grill over high to reheat, about 4 minutes, before finishing as directed above.

 

Bon Appetite June 2015, Chad Colby

Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork On Sale Through July

Summer means barbecues, in the backyard, on the boat, at the beach, on the deck. Hanging with friends and family… fresh tomatoes, corn, watermelon, peaches… and sweet savory barbecue sauce.

slow cooker pulled pork

Sublime Pulled Pork

A slow cooker pulled pork is a great way to feed a crowd, and since you can make it in advance, you get to take off the apron and spend time with your guests.

Our whey-fed pork butt and shoulder roasts are on sale through July at 15% off the regular per pound price. Come into the farm store or ask our market staffer at your local farm market to bring one for you!

We’ve included a recipe here to give you a good start. There are interesting variations for the cooking liquid including root beer, pernilla, and sweet spicy vinegars. Try something new!

Tag us @cherrygrovefarm with pics of your summer fun.

September Flash Sale

With late lambing and calving, we will have a later surge in lamb and beef coming into the  store in autumn. Coupled with an already abundant and consistent supply of pork, we need to make some room in the freezer.

We are running a flash sale through September for certain cuts of our whey-fed Berkshire pork. Whey-fed heritage pork is a delicacy, so stock up now while the sale lasts!

Look for Pork Loin Chops, Boneless Pork Chops, Ham Steaks, Whole Hams, Pork Belly, Smoked Guanciale (pork cheek), and Smoked Andouille Sausage to be 15% off normal per pound prices.

We’ll post a recipe for each of the cuts on sale over the next week. Boneless Pork Chops are the leanest chop, so require a sure hand on the pan. Brining helps the meat retain moisture during cooking, a nice tip for the more nervous cook. Check our facebook page for more recipes and information about cooking pastured pork.

brandy-apple-pork-chops_400

Boneless Pork Chops with Apples
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1 quart water
  • 4 (8 ounce) thick-cut boneless pork chops
  • 1 pinch coarse-ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 apples, cored and quartered

Stir honey and salt into water in a large bowl until honey and salt are dissolved into the brine. Place pork chops in the brine and let sit in the refrigerator for 2 hours.

Remove pork chops from brine, rinse, and pat dry. Place chops on a plate and refrigerate until dry, about 10 minutes. Discard brine.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Sprinkle pepper over the pork chops.

Melt butter and olive oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat; cook pork chops until browned, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip pork chops and season with rosemary; add apples. Cover skillet.

Bake in the preheated oven until pork chops are cooked through, about 10 minutes. 

The chops should be firm when pressed with a spatula. Please note that pastured pork will have a firmer texture because of the pigs’ free range lives.  If you aren’t confident in monitoring the doneness with touch, you should use a thermometer to make sure the internal temperature is between 145 and 150 degrees F. (Pastured meat can go from perfection to tragedy in a minute.) Remove pork chops from skillet and allow to rest five minutes before serving.

 

Modified from AllRecipes.com

 

 

 

Ten Years of Cheesemaking!

“Dishing Up New Jersey” Locavore Farm Dinner

Friday, July 8th
This summer we mark ten years making aged farmstead cheeses. In that time, we have benefited from the expertise of dedicated farmers moving us to a grass-based model, and fine cheesemakers refining recipes and improving our facilities.

We could think of no better way to celebrate our milestone anniversary than by collaborating with some of our favorite local foodsmiths on a farm dinner, designed by local food artisans for local food enthusiasts.

DSC01948

John Holl, NJ food journalist and beer enthusiast is a partner in this event, and will be on hand signing his newest cookbook, “Dishing Up New Jersey”, which features many of our favorite local chef’s and food producers (and our dinner collaborators).

Dine garden-side at the farm with:
Chef Renato of 12 Farms Restaurant in Hightstown,
Barbara Simpson of Muirhead Foods,
Marilyn Besner of Wildflour Bakery and Cafe,
Gabriel and Matt Carbone of The Bent Spoon,
David Zaback at Z Food Farm, and
Mikey Azzarra of Zone 7.

The evening will include a four-course chef’s menu, farm tour, book signing, cheese and beer tasting, and time to enjoy warm summer breezes and the nightly sunset. Cherry Grove Farm cheeses and whey-fed pork will be featured. (There will be a prize for most creative place setting!)

Dinner details can be found here.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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