cherry grove farm

Cow Parade is Here!

Music by The Jersey Corn Pickers

The Cake Off: An Olde Fashioned Baking Competition

Cheesemaker’s Presentation in Cottage

Jammin’ Crepes and Mama Dude’s Food Trucks

Beer by Flying Fish to help Farmers Against Hunger

Vendors this year include:

  • Cherry Grove Organic Farm (veggies)
  • Mecha Artisan Chocolates
  • Unionville Wines
  • Wildflour Bakery and Cafe
  • Mother Tree Collective’s DIY Body Scrubs
  • Lori Lee Books
  • Pinelands Basketry
  • Get Sharp Knife Sharpening
  • Birds and Bees Farm
  • Tracy Ashcroft Antiques
  • Mercer County Master Gardeners
  • Jessica Yeager, Culinary Nutrition Educator

Cows Parade around 4pm (on cow time)

Bonfire is 5-7pm with s’mores by Mecha!

Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork On Sale Through July

Summer means barbecues, in the backyard, on the boat, at the beach, on the deck. Hanging with friends and family… fresh tomatoes, corn, watermelon, peaches… and sweet savory barbecue sauce.

slow cooker pulled pork

Sublime Pulled Pork

A slow cooker pulled pork is a great way to feed a crowd, and since you can make it in advance, you get to take off the apron and spend time with your guests.

Our whey-fed pork butt and shoulder roasts are on sale through July at 15% off the regular per pound price. Come into the farm store or ask our market staffer at your local farm market to bring one for you!

We’ve included a recipe here to give you a good start. There are interesting variations for the cooking liquid including root beer, pernilla, and sweet spicy vinegars. Try something new!

Tag us @cherrygrovefarm with pics of your summer fun.

Spring Blooms

Greetings on this balmy March evening that feels of late May. Seems like just yesterday we were in the depths of January doldrums. Things are in bloom, whether by natural order or not, and I spied fiddleheads at one of our customer co-ops.
 
This all means we are days away from the sound of young moos filling the air, followed in weeks by a hoppin’ influx of milk. Time for this cheesemaker to get his garden planted before all of that hits. Exciting days ahead, indeed. 
 
Inline image 1
Trilby, basking in the afternoon spring light.
 
But unto the cheese:
 
Brie: Young batches of regular size. With limited availability per the usual winter milk supply.
 
Herdsman: Wheels from October and early November. Nice wheels with creamy farmhouse flavor. Baskets return (some with ash through the middle) for those that prefer those!
 
Havilah:  August and Sept 2014 batches. Caramel, grass, pineapple, hints of hazelnut, with a really great texture.
 
Lawrenceville Jack: Our usual creamy grass-fed, mac n cheese buddy. Summer wheels
 
Full Nettle Jack: Spicy oregano and lemon notes shining through from the nettles. Spring and summer wheels.  Raw Milk
 
Trilby: Our local rye whiskey-soused friend is currently available in .50 and 1 lb rounds. Lovely beef, buttermilk and even walnut flavors – and just a fistful o’ funk on that rind. Pasteurized.
 
Sweet cheese dreams! Enjoy these longer evenings.  
 
Psst…don’t forget about this :

Curd Convention at Philly Farm Fest: April 10th

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse

We are knee deep in planning our year’s classes and events. Tamara is setting up expanded cheese making sessions and we are talking with local chefs, restaurateurs, and food fanatics about collaborating on farm dinners and other educational opportunities.

Self-sufficiency seems to be the 2016 theme: home cheesemaking, DIY homesteading techniques to help you stretch the harvest, and seasonal foraging. All good skills should you ever need to survive the zombie apocalypse.

Check out our plans and register here.

 

When the Cows Come Home: The A2 versus A1 debate

friesian head

For the past year or so, we have been in a transitioning from a pasture-based model, where the cows got some grain during winter, to a 99% grass fed dairy. That is a slow transition. Going purely grass fed is both an adjustment for the cows, and for the farmer, who must monitor his cows to see how they are adjusting, and plan appropriately to grow and harvest enough hay for the winter months.

Cows adjusted to grain give more milk, so our grass fed model requires more cows to maintain the volume of milk needed to make our cheeses. In the name of balance, we decided to introduce a few new cows to the herd; ten hearty Friesians with A2A2 genetics.

What are A2A2 genetics, you ask?

It seems that hundreds of years ago there was a mutation in a gene that changed the nature of the proteins in cows’ milk. Now, this was a long time ago, but over generations this A1 mutation predominated in Europe and the US, while the original A2 cows continued to thrive in Africa and Asia.

Fast forward to today. There are many claims about the digestibility and health detriments/benefits of A2 milk versus A1 milk. Although there are no concrete studies to prove it one way or the other, there is a book, “The Devil is in the Milk” by Dr. Keith Woodford, that has become a bible for believers.

There is, however, anecdotal evidence that cows with the original A2 gene are more hardy, more likely to thrive, in a 100% grass fed environment. These are the original cows, with the more feral genetics, and as a grass fed creamery that has meaning for us. Introducing some A2 genetics into our herd seemed right.

After much googling and visiting, we found a farm in New York State with a herd of healthy, thriving grass fed A2 cows that we felt would be a match for our herd. Our ten debutantes arrived the last Friday of February, pushing into the pole barn to get acquainted with the CGF herd. Our girls lined the paddock fence, craning their necks to see the new arrivals, amidst much mooing, snorting, and sniffing.

The new cows will be kept apart for a while to give them time to acclimate, and when the grass springs again, they will be introduced to our pastures and begin their life at the farm. We expect about 45 calves this spring. We hope you will drop by to visit and say hello to the newcomers.

Note: A1A1 and A2A2 genetics are not, as sometimes reported, breed specific. The A1A1 gene may predominate in certain breeds, but you can find A2A2 Holsteins and A1A1 Jerseys. The only way to know for sure is to test the milk.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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