Local Recipe

Flash Sale March 24-25!

Easter is coming… and we have a comfort food classic for your weekend!

 

Whey-fed Berkshire Smoked Ham, New Jersey Maple Syrup, and Artisan Mustard

10% off when purchased together

 

Smoked Ham with a Maple Mustard Glaze

  • 6-10lb Smoked Ham
  • ½ cup Sweet Sourland Farm NJ Maple Syrup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mustard (Muirhead Dijon or Three Monkeys Mustard)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger

Preheat Oven to 325 degrees.

Glaze

Put all ingredients for glaze into a saucepan and whisk together. Bring to boil over medium high heat then lower heat and simmer, stirring often, until thickened a little (about 10 minutes).

Pour 1 cup of water in the bottom of a roasting pan with rack. Place ham on rack and cover with foil. Bake about 18 minutes per pound, or until inner temperature reads about 135 degrees. Remove from oven, uncover, and brush glaze over entire ham.

Return ham to oven uncovered and bake another 20-30 minutes until the glaze caramelizes and internal temperature is 140 degrees. Remove ham from oven and glaze again. Let rest 15 minutes before carving and serving. (While ham is resting internal temp will rise to 145 degrees.)

Flash Sale this weekend!

Saturday, Feb 24th and Sunday, Feb 25th only!
(while supplies last)
 
Pumpkin Ravioli & Bette Davis Eyes.
10% off when bought together.
 

      

Recommended Recipe from Michelle:

Pumpkin Ravioli with a Brown Butter Sage Sauce and crumbled Bette Davis Eyes
 
 
 
4 Tablespoons butter
1.5 teaspoons dried or 1 Tablespoon fresh chopped sage
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 package Nicola’s Pumpkin Ravioli

1/2 cup crumbled Bette Davis Eyes

In medium frying pan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Saute until it turns golden brown. Lower heat. Do not let burn. Add sage, salt and pepper and mix together letting flavors meld. Turn off and hold.
 
Cook ravioli as directed, and as they finish, remove from water with a slotted spoon that allows revioli to drain. Add ravioli to the browned butter sauce, turning heat up to medium. Toss gently to heat and coat thoroughly. Sprinkle with crumbled Bette Davis Eyes and serve.
 
 

Rich, Smoky Ham Hocks and Collard Greens

Braised collards in rich pot likker (pot liquor), simmered with smoked pork and onions until everything is meltingly tender, is a classic Southern dish. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.

 

Why It Works

  • Simmering the ham hocks until the meat falls off the bones creates a deeply flavorful broth.
  • Chicken stock adds even more flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds (680g) meaty smoked ham hocks (see note)
  • 2 medium yellow onions (about 1 pound; 450g), sliced into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 quarts (1.9L) homemade chicken stock, low-sodium store-bought chicken broth, or water
  • 3 pounds (1.3kg) collard greens, woody stems trimmed and leaves cut into thick ribbons
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Apple cider vinegar, to taste (optional)

Directions

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, combine ham hocks, onions, garlic, and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until hocks are very tender, 2 to 3 hours.
  • Remove ham hocks from liquid, transfer to a cutting board, and pull bones from meaty and fatty parts. Discard bones. Chop up meat into chunks and return it to pot.
  • Add collard greens, pressing down to submerge in liquid. Return to a simmer and cook, uncovered, until collards are very tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar to taste, if desired, then serve. (You can add vinegar to the pot, or let individual diners season their greens with it at the table.)

 

Notes

You can swap out the ham hocks for other smoked or cured pork products, like slab bacon or salt pork, as long as they aren’t lean meats, like smoked pork loin. Lean meat will dry up and toughen with extended cooking.

Taken from Daniel Gritzer and Serious Eats

Roasting a Pasture-raised Turkey

Pasture Raised Turkey Roast Recipe

To Roast a Pasture-raised Turkey

As a pasture-based farm, everything we do revolves around the grass and moving our animals from field to field. This system of farming is as old as the fields themselves, and when done well, give our animals and our land the space to thrive.

The last two seasons we have raised a small number of heritage breed Bourbon Red and Royal Palm turkeys. You may have seen them around our garden or the farm cottage, pecking at the fall berries and bugs they find as they roam.

Nothing says Thanksgiving more than that signature golden brown roasted turkey, but if you have chosen to roast a pasture-raised bird there are some things you need to know to get the most from your roast.

Pasture-raised turkeys roam around outside and eat primarily grass and insects, so their food and activity level — both of which affect flavor — differ from those of their grain-fed cousins raised in confinement. Heritage breeds are old-timey birds, developed before factory-farming, that thrive in a free environment. They are built to roam, unlike their confined cousins, the factory farm birds who so heavy of breast and short of leg that they can’t thrive out in the open.

But back to roasting! Our birds are fresh at pick up, and so must be refrigerated once you get home. Some folks choose to bring their bird, but we wanted to share an old fashioned no brine, slow roast method that allows you to taste the natural flavor and juiciness of the bird. This is an old-time recipe for an old-timey, heritage breed turkey.

A room temperature turkey will roast more evenly, so early in the morning remove the turkey from the refrigerator, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry (about an hour before putting it in the oven).

Before putting in the oven, place a good handful of fresh herbs, like rosemary, thyme, and sage, in the body cavity. Rub softened butter, salt, and pepper to the outside skin. (Another alternative is use good olive oil in place of the butter.)

Placed the bird breast down in a roasting pan on a bed of onions, celery and carrots in about a 1/2 to 1/4 inch of chicken broth. The veggies will help keep the bird moist and contribute to a great tasting gravy.

The basic reason most turkeys are dried out and tough is because they are overcooked. The USDA used to recommend cooking a turkey to 180 degrees, to assure all bacteria was killed. That also cooked out the flavor and moisture.

The USDA now says it’s safe to cook a turkey to 165 degrees. Remembering that meat keeps cooking when you take it out of the oven, cook your bird to 160, remove from the oven, and cover tightly with foil to rest. Your internal temp will keep cooking and top about around 165. Use that rest time to make gravy or reheat your sides.

Cooking times are a guide, it is the cooking temperatures that matter, so get a good digital thermometer. You want to roast a pastured bird (this goes for chickens as well) at a lower temperature, so start at 325 and after an hour lower the temperature of the oven to 300. About 30 minutes before the turkey is expected to be done, check the bird’s internal temperature. Pastured-birds can cook more quickly than expected.

10-13 lb. – 1 ½ to 2 ¼ hr.
14-23 lb. – 2 to 3 hr.
24-27 lb. – 3 to 3 ¾ hr.

Baste your turkey twice, when you lower your oven temperature to 300, and again at about the 30 minute mark when you check the internal temperature. Resist the urge to poke the turkey with a fork to check juices. That wastes precious juices that need to stay in the breast meat.

Last year we had great reviews from our customers who roasted their first pastured heritage turkeys. For-armed with a little old time cooking knowledge its not hard to roast the perfect thanksgiving turkey!

Tag us on your turkey “beauty” shot if you are roasting a pastured Cherry Grove Farm bird this year! #cgfpasturedgoodness @cherrygrovefarm

September Flash Sale

With late lambing and calving, we will have a later surge in lamb and beef coming into the  store in autumn. Coupled with an already abundant and consistent supply of pork, we need to make some room in the freezer.

We are running a flash sale through September for certain cuts of our whey-fed Berkshire pork. Whey-fed heritage pork is a delicacy, so stock up now while the sale lasts!

Look for Pork Loin Chops, Boneless Pork Chops, Ham Steaks, Whole Hams, Pork Belly, Smoked Guanciale (pork cheek), and Smoked Andouille Sausage to be 15% off normal per pound prices.

We’ll post a recipe for each of the cuts on sale over the next week. Boneless Pork Chops are the leanest chop, so require a sure hand on the pan. Brining helps the meat retain moisture during cooking, a nice tip for the more nervous cook. Check our facebook page for more recipes and information about cooking pastured pork.

brandy-apple-pork-chops_400

Boneless Pork Chops with Apples
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1 quart water
  • 4 (8 ounce) thick-cut boneless pork chops
  • 1 pinch coarse-ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 apples, cored and quartered

Stir honey and salt into water in a large bowl until honey and salt are dissolved into the brine. Place pork chops in the brine and let sit in the refrigerator for 2 hours.

Remove pork chops from brine, rinse, and pat dry. Place chops on a plate and refrigerate until dry, about 10 minutes. Discard brine.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Sprinkle pepper over the pork chops.

Melt butter and olive oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat; cook pork chops until browned, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip pork chops and season with rosemary; add apples. Cover skillet.

Bake in the preheated oven until pork chops are cooked through, about 10 minutes. 

The chops should be firm when pressed with a spatula. Please note that pastured pork will have a firmer texture because of the pigs’ free range lives.  If you aren’t confident in monitoring the doneness with touch, you should use a thermometer to make sure the internal temperature is between 145 and 150 degrees F. (Pastured meat can go from perfection to tragedy in a minute.) Remove pork chops from skillet and allow to rest five minutes before serving.

 

Modified from AllRecipes.com

 

 

 


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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