Pastured Eggs

Eggs-celent deal!

The days are getting longer and our chickens are feeling the warmth. Lots of eggs available for our customers!
In fact, from Wednesday morning (March 14, 10am) until Sunday evening (March 18, 5pm) we are running a “Spring is coming, I swear it” promotion.
 
Buy 2 dozen or more of our farm eggs and get 25% off your egg purchase.
 
Remember, fresh eggs will last up til 2 months in your refrigerator.

The Agony and The Eggs-tacy

dozeggs

Every winter we face the agony of fewer eggs to sell. It’s a chicken thing. When the days get shorter and colder, the chickens slow down (or stop) laying. Some types of chickens are more cold hardy, but in general… winter means less eggs. And every year we have to face our customers’ disappointment each day when we say, “Sorry, eggs are gone for the day.”

As a sustainable farm we try to do everything in balance… the right number of animals for the land, pasture, and farmers. As such, we raise a limited number of laying hens and that means a finite number of eggs every day, in every season.

Which brings us to the eggs-tacy. These eggs are the real deal… from pasture-raised hens who each fresh grass and insects all day. From a variety of chickens who roam in the same fields with our sheep, spending their days scratching, pecking, and being chickens. They lay eggs in many subtle shades of brown, lavender, blue and green, making each carton a veritable Easter basket of colors.

Our eggs are hand picked every day. We hand wash (no soaking!), and set them out for sale within 12 hours of collection. When you break them open, the yolks are deep orange and the surrounding white has substance. This is not a pallid, watery egg that has been sitting in a cooler or on a truck. Truly pasture-raised eggs are the gold standard.

As the days lengthen and spring turns to summer, our hens start laying in earnest and we again have 20 to 30 dozen pastured eggs to sell to neighbors and farm friends each day. Like everything else on the farm, this is the regular cycle of agony and eggs-tacy.

(Supply is up from January and we see more smiling faces each the morning. Morning is always the best time to find our pastured eggs in the case.)

 

 

 


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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