Pastured Meats

Dinner on the Farm!

A summer evening… the wind rustling through leaves, the gently munching cows in tall grass, and barn swallows swooping across the pastures…

There is nothing quite as satisfying as eating a chef’s dinner outside on the farm… meeting the farmers, hearing the love of good food and farming from the man who cooks and the folks who grow and make your food. Sit with friends, old and new, and share a well made meal as the moon rises and the fireflies start their evening dance.

Join us on July 6th when Chef Barry Sexton creates a five-course evening to remember with Cherry Grove Farm cheeses, eggs and meats, and fresh produce from Abe’s Acres. Enjoy a short farm tour, cocktail hour with artisan cheese board, and five grass-fed courses crafted and presented by Chef Sexton of The Rooted Affair.

More details and tickets are available here, at The Rooted Affair’s website

Join Our Journey Along the Spice Route

Dine in our farm garden under white lanterns, enjoying a four course farm-to-fork dinner that will transport you along the ancient spice route from Persian into South Asia.

Cherry Grove Farm will co-host this culinary journey with local Lawrenceville makers (and friends of the farm) Naomi Mobed from Le Bon Magot and The Agarwal family from Pure Indian Foods.

Tapping into our friends’ culinary traditions, we’ve created a soul-satisfying menu with a modern twist, using Cherry Grove Farm’s farmstead cheeses and grass-fed lamb and the bounty of fresh New Jersey fruits and vegetables.

The evening will begin with a short farm tour and cocktail hour featuring Lychee and Rose martinis, and Jal-jeera, a cumin-intense mocktail. Appetizers will include vegetarian pakoras, a CGF cheese board with Le Bon Magot chutneys, and hummus drizzled with Brinjal Caponata.

The sit down portion of the meal is mostly vegetarian with a Burmese lamb entree for our meat-lovers. Look forward to Saag Paneer with foraged greens,  Persian Jeweled Rice, Aloo Gobi with Mutter, Masala Roasted Jersey Corn, Fatoush Salad with pomegranate and a honey lemon vinaigrette, and Naan bread.

We round out our evening with a Lassi White Peach Parfait, Gulab Jamoon petit fours, and a raw milk Masala Chai.

Cocktail hour begins at 6:30. Dinner at 7:30pm.
Bring your own creative place setting (prizes given!) and a favorite alcoholic beverage. Pairings suggestions will be sent with confirmation email.

Tickets are $85 in advance, and $95 dollars within five days of the dinner. There are only 30 seats. Get your ticket today.

(If your have trouble with the link, type www.shopcherrygrovefarm.com into your browser and click the events tab.)

Winning place setting at the Dishing Up NJ Farm-to-Fork

Flash Sale March 24-25!

Easter is coming… and we have a comfort food classic for your weekend!

 

Whey-fed Berkshire Smoked Ham, New Jersey Maple Syrup, and Artisan Mustard

10% off when purchased together

 

Smoked Ham with a Maple Mustard Glaze

  • 6-10lb Smoked Ham
  • ½ cup Sweet Sourland Farm NJ Maple Syrup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mustard (Muirhead Dijon or Three Monkeys Mustard)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger

Preheat Oven to 325 degrees.

Glaze

Put all ingredients for glaze into a saucepan and whisk together. Bring to boil over medium high heat then lower heat and simmer, stirring often, until thickened a little (about 10 minutes).

Pour 1 cup of water in the bottom of a roasting pan with rack. Place ham on rack and cover with foil. Bake about 18 minutes per pound, or until inner temperature reads about 135 degrees. Remove from oven, uncover, and brush glaze over entire ham.

Return ham to oven uncovered and bake another 20-30 minutes until the glaze caramelizes and internal temperature is 140 degrees. Remove ham from oven and glaze again. Let rest 15 minutes before carving and serving. (While ham is resting internal temp will rise to 145 degrees.)

Heritage Turkeys!

Thanksgiving is right around the corner! Don’t forget to pre-order your pasture-raised heritage turkey from the farm. Come in to the store, or call us. Store staff will walk you through the details, take your name, and a deposit.Pick up days are the Monday and Tuesday before T-Day.

Our Bourbon Red and Royal Palm turkeys are smaller than a store-bought Butterball, but the taste of a pasture-raised bird is sublime. This will be our last year raising heritage turkeys so don’t miss your chance to taste the difference!

Cooking a pastured turkey is also a little bit different. For cooking tips, visit our Roasting  a Pastured Turkey with hints from our grass-fed guru, Shannon Hayes.

#shopsmall  #pasturedpoultry

Rich, Smoky Ham Hocks and Collard Greens

Braised collards in rich pot likker (pot liquor), simmered with smoked pork and onions until everything is meltingly tender, is a classic Southern dish. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.

 

Why It Works

  • Simmering the ham hocks until the meat falls off the bones creates a deeply flavorful broth.
  • Chicken stock adds even more flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds (680g) meaty smoked ham hocks (see note)
  • 2 medium yellow onions (about 1 pound; 450g), sliced into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 quarts (1.9L) homemade chicken stock, low-sodium store-bought chicken broth, or water
  • 3 pounds (1.3kg) collard greens, woody stems trimmed and leaves cut into thick ribbons
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Apple cider vinegar, to taste (optional)

Directions

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, combine ham hocks, onions, garlic, and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until hocks are very tender, 2 to 3 hours.
  • Remove ham hocks from liquid, transfer to a cutting board, and pull bones from meaty and fatty parts. Discard bones. Chop up meat into chunks and return it to pot.
  • Add collard greens, pressing down to submerge in liquid. Return to a simmer and cook, uncovered, until collards are very tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar to taste, if desired, then serve. (You can add vinegar to the pot, or let individual diners season their greens with it at the table.)

 

Notes

You can swap out the ham hocks for other smoked or cured pork products, like slab bacon or salt pork, as long as they aren’t lean meats, like smoked pork loin. Lean meat will dry up and toughen with extended cooking.

Taken from Daniel Gritzer and Serious Eats


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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