Press

Rarebird Wins Silver at ACS Conference

Cherry Grove Farm is proud and excited to share that our newest farmstead cheese, Rarebird, was awarded a Silver Medal at the 2018 American Cheese Society (ACS) competition in Pittsburgh about three weeks ago.

The ACS Conference is the premier cheese event of North America; Artisan cheesemakers from all over the world gather to meet, learn, and taste the best cheeses being made in the United States and Canada. Rarebird was entered in the Farmstead Cows’ Milk category and was up against some seriously tough competition.

Rarebird is the newest cheese in Cherry Grove Farm’s lineup, after 12 months of fine tuning, our cheesemakers, Paul Lawler and Sean Fitzgerald have honed in on the texture and flavors that we want this cheese to express. Some of you may have tried Rarebird over the last year, as we tweaked and adjusted “the care and feeding” of the cheese to see what it could be.

A washed rind, raw milk cheese aged between 60 and 90 days, Rarebird’s defining characteristic is that it is made with the milk of only one single milking. This ensures not only that the milk is as fresh as possible, but also that the unique tastes and seasonality of the terroir of our Lawrenceville pastures stands out. When mature, the paste has a silky, custardy feel, giving off a whiff of minerally sea cave and a bit of the barnyard.

It takes a lot of behind-the-scenes work and care from a small, dedicated group of hardworking people (and cows!) to make real food. And we’re very proud to announce the recognition of our hard work. This silver medal joins three blue ribbons from ACS in prior years.

Our cheesemakers recommend that Rarebird be served at room temperature and paired with Gewurtztraminer, Dolcetto, or a strong dark ale. The next batch should be mature in mid-September.

A Blue Ribbon for Cherry Grove Cheesemaking

Another Blue Ribbon Cheese for Cherry Grove Farm

We are proud to announce that “Abruzze Jawn” was a blue-ribbon winner for Cherry Grove Farm at the 2015 American Cheese Society Conference Awards on July 31,

Customers this earlier this summer were introduced to this meaty, smoky cheese through the farm store and local farm markets.  “A simple Jack recipe allows the quality of the grass-fed milk to shine and creates a backdrop for our seasonal line of flavored cheeses,” said Head Cheesemaker, Paul Lawler. “Our ‘Abruzze Jawn’ is a blend of six different smoked and sweet peppers with green peppercorns that harmonize to give the cheese robust, salami-like flavors.”

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Farmstead cheeses are all about terroir, the unique flavors imparted by the land and forage of a specific place. Fittingly, the name “Abruzze Jawn” also reflects the local terroir. “Abruzze Jawn was named, firstly, because it tastes like salami,” offered Jamie Png, cheesemaker at Cherry Grove Farm, “And secondly, because Jack is short for John, and ‘Jawn’ is short for everything.”

‘Jawn’ is Philadelphia slang for a thing, or anything you cannot recall the word for at a moment. It is also the Philadelphia pronunciation of the name John, of which Jack (as in Monterey Jack) is a diminutive. These cheesemakers know their stuff.

This is the third blue ribbon for Cherry Grove Farm in three years. We previously won blues for our Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve cheeses.

Come in to the farm store for a taste, we will be sampling Abruzze Jawn all week!

Animal Welfare Approval

CGF Earns Animal Welfare Approval

It’s now widely accepted that raising animals intensively – indoors or confined on dirt feedlots – is not only bad for animals, but is also harming human health and the wider environment. The headlines speak volumes about our broken food system: about the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, environmental pollution from intensive farming systems, and animal welfare abuses.

In 2006, a program was founded to address the growing consumer demand for meat, eggs and dairy products from animals treated to the highest welfare standards and managed with the environment in mind. Animal Welfare Approval (AWA) audits, certifies and supports independent family farmers raising their animals according to the highest standards, outdoors on pasture or range. Called a “badge of honor for farmers” and the “gold standard,” AWA has come to be the most highly regarded food label when it comes to animal welfare, pasture-based farming, and sustainability.

The AWA program operates on the simple understanding that the way we raise our animals, the nutritional quality of the meat, milk and eggs they produce, and the impact of farming systems on the environment, are all intrinsically linked. We know that if we manage our animals properly and according to their needs, we don’t have to rely on things like routine antibiotics and other chemical inputs to farm. We know that healthy, content animals produce better tasting, healthier meat, milk and eggs. And we know that pasture-based farming livestock systems can actually have a positive impact on the environment, too. Click here to learn more about the benefits of pasture-based farming.

Cherry Grove Farm is proud to have been given Animal Welfare Approval for our fully pastured laying hens. Our heritage breed birds live in mobile coops and are moved several times a week to follow our sheep through their pasture.

Read more on our Press Page.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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