farm dinner

Dinner on the Farm!

A summer evening… the wind rustling through leaves, the gently munching cows in tall grass, and barn swallows swooping across the pastures…

There is nothing quite as satisfying as eating a chef’s dinner outside on the farm… meeting the farmers, hearing the love of good food and farming from the man who cooks and the folks who grow and make your food. Sit with friends, old and new, and share a well made meal as the moon rises and the fireflies start their evening dance.

Join us on July 6th when Chef Barry Sexton creates a five-course evening to remember with Cherry Grove Farm cheeses, eggs and meats, and fresh produce from Abe’s Acres. Enjoy a short farm tour, cocktail hour with artisan cheese board, and five grass-fed courses crafted and presented by Chef Sexton of The Rooted Affair.

More details and tickets are available here, at The Rooted Affair’s website

A Farm-to-Table Journey Along The Spice Route

SAVE THE DATE!

Tell your friends! Saturday, July 21st Cherry Grove Farm will co-host a farm-to-table culinary journey with our neighbors, Naomi at Le Bon Magot and The Agarwals from Pure Indian Foods.

Thirty people will share a 4-course meal that leads us from the Middle East to South-Asia, featuring fresh farm fare and the flavors of the old spice route. The menu will be heavily vegetarian but will include Cherry Grove Farm lamb and cheese.

The evening will begin with a 30-minute farm tour and cocktail hour to include Lychee and Rose martinis, vegetarian pakoras and hummus drizzled with Brinjal Caponata.

The sit down portion of the meal will be 2 entrees and a variety of sides, including Burmese Lamb cooked in almond and cashew gravy, Saag Paneer with farm-foraged greens,  Persian Jeweled Rice, Aloo Gobi with Mutter, and more.

We will end the evening with a few sweet treats and a raw milk Masala Chai.

Registration details to follow soon! Stay tuned!

#alongthespiceroute #cgffarmtofork

!Ven, Fiesta!

A few years ago “farm to table” was a new concept. It fell under the same category as whiskey bars and latte foam art. And as much as we love a well-curated whiskey haunt, so too have we come to love “farm to table”. The latter has become a way of life, drawing attention to the importance of organic growing, the ecological havoc wreaked by not eating local, and the true treasures in our own backyards. As a farm, we want “farm to table” to keep its momentum. So the question becomes, how? And with so many small farms popping up, how is our approach unique.

For us the answer lies in Farm Dinners. (Though the concept is the same, we’ve dropped “to table” – the term has lost the shiny new appeal it had in its rollout.) Every farm has its own version, but no two farms are exactly alike. At Cherry Grove Farm, we have a beautiful, peaceful property, just far enough off the beaten path to be “out-of-the-way”, but so close to everything that we could throw a stone to hit it. These dinners provide new eyes through which to see not just our farm, but small farming in general. And since everyone who works here is passionate about what we do (and does cool, related stuff on the side), there’s always a conversation.

Now everyone has an opinion about the type of cuisine for these things, and suggestions run from straight-up local to the Middle East, and with so many talented culinarians 12963407_1140513845989600_2944712135190115925_nin the area, the challenge becomes, not choosing the food, but finding someone who can bring local “farm to table” to exotic cuisine, and transport us, if only for an evening, to another place. Shelley Wiseman is that someone: her locality at Tullamore Farms puts her right in our circle, and she doesn’t just dabble in exotics: she was immersed in Mexican culture, living in Mexico for five years running her own French cooking school. It makes perfect sense for her to kick off our Farm Dinner season with “Fiesta Cinco de Mayo”.

Dinner is on Friday May 6, a day late for the holiday, but never mind. And this early in the season it might still be a bit nippy; we’re not worried ‘bout that, either. I am just so looking forward to her pork pozole, a warm stew for a spring night – and to kicking back in front of a roaring fire after dinner. Can you think of a better way to spend an evening with friends? Neither can I.

Join us here.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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