whey-fed berkshire pork

Flash Sale March 24-25!

Easter is coming… and we have a comfort food classic for your weekend!

 

Whey-fed Berkshire Smoked Ham, New Jersey Maple Syrup, and Artisan Mustard

10% off when purchased together

 

Smoked Ham with a Maple Mustard Glaze

  • 6-10lb Smoked Ham
  • ½ cup Sweet Sourland Farm NJ Maple Syrup
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mustard (Muirhead Dijon or Three Monkeys Mustard)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger

Preheat Oven to 325 degrees.

Glaze

Put all ingredients for glaze into a saucepan and whisk together. Bring to boil over medium high heat then lower heat and simmer, stirring often, until thickened a little (about 10 minutes).

Pour 1 cup of water in the bottom of a roasting pan with rack. Place ham on rack and cover with foil. Bake about 18 minutes per pound, or until inner temperature reads about 135 degrees. Remove from oven, uncover, and brush glaze over entire ham.

Return ham to oven uncovered and bake another 20-30 minutes until the glaze caramelizes and internal temperature is 140 degrees. Remove ham from oven and glaze again. Let rest 15 minutes before carving and serving. (While ham is resting internal temp will rise to 145 degrees.)

Rich, Smoky Ham Hocks and Collard Greens

Braised collards in rich pot likker (pot liquor), simmered with smoked pork and onions until everything is meltingly tender, is a classic Southern dish. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.

 

Why It Works

  • Simmering the ham hocks until the meat falls off the bones creates a deeply flavorful broth.
  • Chicken stock adds even more flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds (680g) meaty smoked ham hocks (see note)
  • 2 medium yellow onions (about 1 pound; 450g), sliced into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 quarts (1.9L) homemade chicken stock, low-sodium store-bought chicken broth, or water
  • 3 pounds (1.3kg) collard greens, woody stems trimmed and leaves cut into thick ribbons
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Apple cider vinegar, to taste (optional)

Directions

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, combine ham hocks, onions, garlic, and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until hocks are very tender, 2 to 3 hours.
  • Remove ham hocks from liquid, transfer to a cutting board, and pull bones from meaty and fatty parts. Discard bones. Chop up meat into chunks and return it to pot.
  • Add collard greens, pressing down to submerge in liquid. Return to a simmer and cook, uncovered, until collards are very tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar to taste, if desired, then serve. (You can add vinegar to the pot, or let individual diners season their greens with it at the table.)

 

Notes

You can swap out the ham hocks for other smoked or cured pork products, like slab bacon or salt pork, as long as they aren’t lean meats, like smoked pork loin. Lean meat will dry up and toughen with extended cooking.

Taken from Daniel Gritzer and Serious Eats

Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork On Sale Through July

Summer means barbecues, in the backyard, on the boat, at the beach, on the deck. Hanging with friends and family… fresh tomatoes, corn, watermelon, peaches… and sweet savory barbecue sauce.

slow cooker pulled pork

Sublime Pulled Pork

A slow cooker pulled pork is a great way to feed a crowd, and since you can make it in advance, you get to take off the apron and spend time with your guests.

Our whey-fed pork butt and shoulder roasts are on sale through July at 15% off the regular per pound price. Come into the farm store or ask our market staffer at your local farm market to bring one for you!

We’ve included a recipe here to give you a good start. There are interesting variations for the cooking liquid including root beer, pernilla, and sweet spicy vinegars. Try something new!

Tag us @cherrygrovefarm with pics of your summer fun.


1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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