Latest News from the Farm

Heritage Turkeys!

Thanksgiving is right around the corner! Don’t forget to pre-order your pasture-raised heritage turkey from the farm. Come in to the store, or call us. Store staff will walk you through the details, take your name, and a deposit.Pick up days are the Monday and Tuesday before T-Day.

Our Bourbon Red and Royal Palm turkeys are smaller than a store-bought Butterball, but the taste of a pasture-raised bird is sublime. This will be our last year raising heritage turkeys so don’t miss your chance to taste the difference!

Cooking a pastured turkey is also a little bit different. For cooking tips, visit our Roasting  a Pastured Turkey with hints from our grass-fed guru, Shannon Hayes.

#shopsmall  #pasturedpoultry

Cow Parade is Here!

Music by The Jersey Corn Pickers

The Cake Off: An Olde Fashioned Baking Competition

Cheesemaker’s Presentation in Cottage

Jammin’ Crepes and Mama Dude’s Food Trucks

Beer by Flying Fish to help Farmers Against Hunger

Vendors this year include:

  • Cherry Grove Organic Farm (veggies)
  • Mecha Artisan Chocolates
  • Unionville Wines
  • Wildflour Bakery and Cafe
  • Mother Tree Collective’s DIY Body Scrubs
  • Lori Lee Books
  • Pinelands Basketry
  • Get Sharp Knife Sharpening
  • Birds and Bees Farm
  • Tracy Ashcroft Antiques
  • Mercer County Master Gardeners
  • Jessica Yeager, Culinary Nutrition Educator

Cows Parade around 4pm (on cow time)

Bonfire is 5-7pm with s’mores by Mecha!

Rich, Smoky Ham Hocks and Collard Greens

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Braised collards in rich pot likker (pot liquor), simmered with smoked pork and onions until everything is meltingly tender, is a classic Southern dish. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.

 

Why It Works

  • Simmering the ham hocks until the meat falls off the bones creates a deeply flavorful broth.
  • Chicken stock adds even more flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds (680g) meaty smoked ham hocks (see note)
  • 2 medium yellow onions (about 1 pound; 450g), sliced into 2-inch lengths
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 quarts (1.9L) homemade chicken stock, low-sodium store-bought chicken broth, or water
  • 3 pounds (1.3kg) collard greens, woody stems trimmed and leaves cut into thick ribbons
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Apple cider vinegar, to taste (optional)

Directions

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, combine ham hocks, onions, garlic, and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until hocks are very tender, 2 to 3 hours.
  • Remove ham hocks from liquid, transfer to a cutting board, and pull bones from meaty and fatty parts. Discard bones. Chop up meat into chunks and return it to pot.
  • Add collard greens, pressing down to submerge in liquid. Return to a simmer and cook, uncovered, until collards are very tender, about 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar to taste, if desired, then serve. (You can add vinegar to the pot, or let individual diners season their greens with it at the table.)

 

Notes

You can swap out the ham hocks for other smoked or cured pork products, like slab bacon or salt pork, as long as they aren’t lean meats, like smoked pork loin. Lean meat will dry up and toughen with extended cooking.

Taken from Daniel Gritzer and Serious Eats

Notes from the Vat

We have a new friendly face in the makeroom! Meet intern extraordinaire, Christine Shaw. 
Here’s a bit of Q&A before we get down to business:

Tell us about yourself!  I was born and raised in central New Jersey, and my greatest loves are food, animals, and books of all kinds. I graduated from The Culinary Institute of America back in December, and now I’m thrilled to be exploring cheesework on such a beautiful farm!

What do you enjoy most about the farm or the cheesework so far?  I love being in such close proximity to so many animals. It’s wonderful being able to pet the cats on my walks to and from the creamery, feed the goats my vegetable scraps, and hear the cows mooing from my bedroom at night. It all feels very peaceful. As for the cheesework, I love affinage! It’s a great opportunity to sort of study each wheel and watch it develop as it ages.

If you could be any Cherry Grove animal, who would it be?  The guinea hen! She’s beautiful, and her only job is to wander around the farm. It sounds like a pretty good deal!

Favorite cheese?   That’s a tough question. There are so many cheeses that I love, but Brie has a special place in my heart.

Favorite Cherry Grove Cheese?  The Trilby! The flavors are unbelievable. Our farm’s terroir, the Dad’s Hat whiskey, and the fig leaves all come together and create these amazing apricot and hay notes, and I just love it.

Thanks for joining us, Christine. Speaking of Trilby, we have a gorgeous batch of Trilby this week.

This Week in CHEESE! CHEESE! CHEESE! 
Buttercup Brie
Tastes like it sounds, like pure cultured butter. With a slight hint of mushroom under the rind. Mini ½ lbs and quarter wedges. Pasteurized.

Havilah
Batches from early spring/summer 2016 with notes of malt, beef stew, mushroom, and toasted brioche. Nice balance of sweet and savory. Raw.

Toma
Limited availability, batches from early August. Beautiful pinkish orange-shaded wheels, nice and beefy, roasted peanut and cashew flavors. Perfect for melting or snacking. Raw.

Trilby
Limited availability, from early September. Beautiful pinkish orange shaded wheels, nice and beefy, buttermilk, stonefruits, grass and hay- and a lovely butter texture. An ideal fall dessert with Seckel or Asian Pears. Pastuerized.

Herdsman
A really nice batch from July milk. Barnyardy, notes of bread n butter, walnuts, and cultured cream. Raw.

Grass-fed Veal Sale through August

Sharing a recipe for a grilled rack of veal in honor of our August sale (20% off our Grass-fed Rose Veal). Get it while it lasts.

 

Grilled Porcini-Rubbed Rack of Veal

Serves 8

Ingredients

    • 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
    • 1/4 cup porcini mushroom powder (from about 3/4 ounce dried mushrooms)
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
    • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
    • 1 (5–6-pounds) six-bone rack of veal, chine bone removed (not frenched)
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • Flaky sea salt

Special equipment:

    • A spice mill or a mortar and pestle

Preparation

  • Prepare grill for medium–high, indirect heat (for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one side of grill; for a gas grill, leave one or two burners off). Coarsely grind red pepper flakes in spice mill or with mortar and pestle. Combine ground red pepper flakes, porcini powder, sugar, kosher salt, and black pepper in a small bowl.
  • Rub veal all over with oil, followed by enough spice mixture to coat nicely (about 1/2 cup), patting to adhere.
  • Grill veal over direct heat, turning occasionally, until deeply browned all over, 15–20 minutes total. Move veal to indirect heat, placing bone side down, and grill, turning every 20 minutes or so, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of loin registers 115°, 1 1/2–2 hours. (Check after 30 minutes—once thermometer registers 100°, the temperature will climb much faster.) Meat will continue to cook when taken off the grill, so pull 10° before finishing temp.
  • Transfer veal to a cutting board and let rest 5 minutes. Cut loin from the bones in one piece. Slice between bones to separate and grill over direct heat, turning often, until crisped and well charred, about 5 minutes.
  • Grill loin over direct heat, cut side up, just to reheat slightly (do not grill the cut side), about 4 minutes. Slice loin 1/2″ thick and transfer to a platter. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve with bones alongside.

Finishing Temps

  • Rare — 120F
  • Medium Rare — 125F
  • Medium — 130F
  • Medium Well — 135F
  • Well — 140F

Just remember, if you like your meat more on the medium to well done side, make sure you turn the heat way down to allow the meat to cook slowly. Your patience will be rewarded.

Do Ahead

  1. Veal can be grilled 2 hours ahead. Do not cut meat from bones; hold at room temperature. Grill over high to reheat, about 4 minutes, before finishing as directed above.

 

Bon Appetite June 2015, Chad Colby

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1902 - Family purchased farm

1910 - Leased land to dairy farmer

1987 - Hamill Brothers inherit farm

2002 - Started as a family business

2003 - Started a beef herd, laying hens, and pigs

2004 - Added sheep and attained organic certification of pasture land

2005 - Added dairy herd and began making fresh cheeses like mozzarella

2006 - Built aging caves and began making aged cheeses

2012 - Grid Magazine’s Cheese of the Month (Nov – Full Nettle Jack); Finalist at the Good Food Awards (Toma)

2013 - Won 2 blue ribbons from the American Cheese Society(for Buttercup Brie and Lawrenceville Jack Reserve); Added second cheesemaker

2014 - Broke ground on additional aging space and began process of getting AWA certification for our chickens
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